Ars Antigua Presents: Summer Quarter 2013

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Based on the Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice, Claudio Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo has come down through history as one of the earliest operas to employ the full resources of the orchestra. Monteverdi’s use of polyphony, and especially his innovative orchestration, dazzled audiences at the 1607 Premiere. The original score called for about a dozen vocalists and over forty instrumentalists, including brass, winds, strings, harpsichord, organ, and percussion. In L’Orfeo Symphonia, we will hear some of the memorable tunes from that opera, performed on period strings and continuo.

Claudio Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo Symphonia, as performed by the Baroque Ensemble of Brigham Young University-Idaho, under the direction of Robert Tueller.

Video for L’Orfeo Symphonia

Ars Antigua Presents promotes the work of early music students at the high school and college levels. If you know of an ensemble that represents this next generation of performers, let us know and they may be featured on our podcast.

Podcast produced by Joshua Sauvageau

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Ars Antigua Presents: Spring Quarter 2013

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Jacquet de la Guerre

Élisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre is best remembered as the first French woman to write an opera (Cephale et Procris in 1694). She was born into a family of musicians and performed upon the harpsichord for Louis XIV when she was just five years old. According to contemporary accounts, she was a virtuosic keyboard player, dazzling audiences at court and in her home. Her oevre includes stage music, cantates, a book of pièces de clavessin,

several sonatas for violin and continuo and some trio sonatas.

This is Jacquet de la Guerre’s Trio Sonata in D Major, performed by La Donna Musicale.

Ars Antigua Presents promotes the work of early music students at the high school and college levels. If you know of an ensemble that represents this next generation of performers, let us know and they may be featured on our podcast.

Podcast produced by Joshua Sauvageau

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Ars Antigua Presents: Winter Quarter 2012

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Working and living almost exclusively in early-eighteenth century Paris, Louis-Nicolas Clérambault was primarily an organist. While employed in the Parisian churches of Grands-Augustins and Saint-Sulpice, he honed his skills as a composer. While Clérambault was organist and choir director at the royal house of Saint-Cyr he developed the French Cantata form and was widely heralded as the master of the genre.

Clérambault (1676-1749)

Many of Clérambault’s secular cantatas were concerned with Greco-Roman subjects and have titles like Orphée, Apollon, and La mort d’Hercule. We will now hear a selection from one of these secular cantatas, titled Léandre et Héro. This is a Récitatif and Air fort et tendre from Léandre et Héro of Cantates françoises, livre II by Louis-Nicolas Clérambault. This performance is by Génération Harmonique.

Ars Antigua Presents promotes the work of early music students at the high school and college levels. If you know of an ensemble that represents this next generation of performers, let us know and they may be featured on our podcast.

Podcast produced by Joshua Sauvageau

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